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A thing or two about computers and sleeping

by on May 31, 2015
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Positives

A definite influence on my sleep pattern existed from the beginning.
It's free.
It's fully automatic.
The fallback to daytime means it's easy to do color sensitive stuff during nighttime.

Negatives

No Android version.

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Reccomended!

 

Computers. They are undoubtedly a nice thing. However, no good things come without a bad side to them. Have you ever tried to go to sleep after sitting behind your computer – working or not – for the major part of the day? Pretty much impossible – right? Yeah, I think that too. For me, personally, reducing work time doesn’t work either – I end up not falling asleep anyways – mostly because of overthinking.

Well, to all of those fall-asleep-not-ers, rest assured, there is a solution. And that solution comes in the elegant shape of f.lux, available for Windows, Linux, OS X, and iOS. The f.lux homepage has this to say about the app: “f.lux makes your computer screen look like the room you’re in, all the time. When the sun sets, it makes your computer look like your indoor lights. In the morning, it makes things look like sunlight again.”

So it pretty much comes down to the simple fact – computer screens look good during the day, just because they’re designed to do just that. At nighttime, start your computer, aand.. hello blindness! Aaah, horrible, right? That’s where f.lux comes in. You provide it with your location and during the daytime, it lets you operate your computer normally. Come sundown, and it starts dropping the Kelvins on your display – making the colors much, much warmer and in theory – helping you fall asleep better.

I have personally used it for several weeks and I find it bloody fantastic! Immediate effects – my eyes were much more customized to the warmer, 3400K tones, rather than the day-time 6500K (major difference!) colors. The fall of the brightness of the display gradually starts around 30 minutes before sundown, and drops at a rather reasonable rate of 1K/s , until reaching the bottom 3400K mark.

If you do happen to be a occasional night-time worker, and do color-sensitive stuff on your computer, then thankfully f.lux can be turned off for for a maximum of an hour – this gives back the day-time brightness, which, while being useful burns out your eyes..

This writer reccomends it! Try it out here.

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